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Archive for the ‘Little Known Facts’ Category

HPIM0097.JPGFrom time to time I run across interesting articles about art and paint that I feel should be shared.  This is one of those.  I ran across this on The Artist’s Road…a terrific little site with interesting articles.  This one was particularly good.  It starts like this:  “It is hard for artists, spoiled as we are by the easy availability of all the colors of the rainbow, to imagine a world wherein one of our important and necessary colors costs more than gold. But that was the world before 1703. The strongest and most useful permanent blue at that time was ultramarine, from the words “oltre marino”—referring to it being brought from “over the sea”. So expensive was it that artists had to rely on their wealthy clients to buy it for them. ”   Read the rest of it here.  Some of the best known paintings using Prussian Blue is Van Gogh’s Starry Night and The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Hokusai.

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151017salvator“The rediscovered masterpiece, Salvator Mundi, by the Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci sells for an historic $450,312,500, obliterating the previous world record for the most expensive work of art at auction.”  Read more here.

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VanGogh Olive TreesYIKES!!!  A grasshopper has been found in Van Gogh’s painting of the Olive Trees.  One of the things that painters who work outdoors (en Plein air) face is the elements….bugs, dirt, etc.  And it appears that Van Gogh dealt with them too.  Here is what he wrote to his brother, Theo, about it in 1885:  “But just go and sit outdoors, painting on the spot itself!” Vincent wrote. “Then all sorts of things like the following happen — I must have picked up a good hundred flies and more off the 4 canvases that you’ll be getting, not to mention dust and sand … when one carries a team of them across the heath and through hedgerows for a few hours, the odd branch or two scrapes across them….”    Read the entire article about the grasshopper discover here ….and see the grasshopper!

 

 

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Warhol Sled.jpgAs much as I despise starting with the Christmas “stuff” already, it is something we have to do to prepare for parties with a Christmas theme.  So here is our next Famous Painters party with a holiday theme.  We are painting a Warhol sled.  Join us on Tuesday, November 28th at 6 pm and personalize your sled and packages.  Click here to register.

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Last night I had the pleasure of attending a local Women’s Resource Center lecture featuring Christine Andreae, an artist and writer from our community, who gave a fascinating account of her Inanna Project.   It is amazing!  She shared her wonderful world of woodcut art  with us through a Facebook Live interview with Eka Kapiotis (you see them in the photo below) and Christine answered many questions concerning her process.  You can read about the project here.  And see each woodcut and explanation here.  Take a little time to look.  It’s extraordinary!

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The movie, Loving Vincent, that we saw on Monday at The Avalon reminded me of some things about Vincent Van Gogh.  Here are some of his famous paintings that the movie brought to life along with some interesting facts:

  1. Did you know that Van Gogh didn’t start painting until he was 27 years old?  Maybe that gives hope to all of us late bloomers out there.
  2. Did you know that he produced his most famous painting while in an asylum in Saint-Remy-de-Provence, France. He painted Starry Night while in this mental hospital.  (You can paint Starry Night with us on Friday.  Click here to register.)
  3. In just the ten years that he painted he produced about 900 oil paintings….some the most famous paintings in the world today.
  4. Van GOgh Red VineyardSome say none but other references say he sold just one painting in his lifetime.  It was called “The Red Vineyard”.
  5. His brother, Theo, supported him in his art providing supplies and encouragement was with Vincent when he died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. (Some sources say that he was shot by a village boy.) Theo reported that Vincent’s last words were  “the sadness will last forever.”

It’s hard to believe such a tortured soul produced so many beautiful works of art.  He painted flowers and landscapes like no other and mainly because he was so poor he couldn’t afford to pay models to sit for him.  We’re lucky he chose to paint.

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We have been following along with the group that created the film “Loving Vincent” for several years now and finally yesterday we SAW it!  It is an amazing film.  Many artists painted for several years to created the 65,000 painted frames that made up the film.  They painted 853 shots in the film.  They began by painting a scene on canvas and then continued to paint over it as each frame was shot in order to make the painting “move and come to life”.  WOW!

20171017_060008.jpgHere’s what their website says about the film:  “Loving Vincent is the world’s first fully painted film.  We painted over 65,000 frames on over 1,000 canvases. We shot the film with actors, and literally painted over it frame by frame. This is a very laborious and time-consuming process. It has taken us 4 years to develop the technique, and it took us over 2 years with a team of over 100 painters working at studios in the Polish cities of Gdansk and Wroclaw, and a studio in Athens to complete the film.
 
The reason we made the film is not because we want to be the first, or that we want to set any records, it is because we believe that you cannot truly tell Vincent’s story without his paintings, so we needed to bring his paintings to life.”

If you appreciate Van Gogh’s art you MUST go see the film.  Watching his paintings move…come to life is amazing.  For those in our area it is playing at The Avalon in DC, where we went yesterday to see it but it will be opening in Winchester at The Alamo on October 27th.  Go see it!  There is a lot of information on the production’s website.  Take a look.

(The photos above are an exterior shot of the Avalon Theatre on Connecticut Avenue in DC and the poster outside the door.  There is also a photo of the group from The Studio who went to see the film yesterday.  The final two photos are the ceiling inside the theatre at The Avalon and a shot of a advertising banner about Loving Vincent.)

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